USS Texas: Meet the Museum Volunteers

General News
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The Dreadnought Guardians 

Museum ships don’t take care of themselves. It takes a dedicated group of volunteers to ensure everything is shipshape! 

As part of our monthlong endeavor to keep USS Texas afloat and raise awareness, we reached out to two volunteers from the Battleship Texas Foundation to tell us their stories.

Marco

What’s a day in the life on battleship Texas for you? 

I arrive at the ship, shoot the breeze a bit with staff and volunteers, then get to work. I love my job, but it’s not easy telling others about it. It feels incredible to put in a hard day’s work every weekend for a year and see a project come to completion. 

If all goes according to plan, that project should be finished by the time this gets published.

When did you notice that Texas was listing and what were your immediate thoughts? 

I was there by chance that day in June during the last major flooding incident. I only noticed it after a typically-opened armored door slammed shut behind me. Confused, I went outside and saw water pouring from the main mast just above me, even though it hadn’t rained for a few days. Once I saw this, I finally noticed the ship leaning more than usual. I had to find the closest staff member and do what I could to help, no matter how limited.

How long have you been volunteering aboard the museum ship?

Almost every weekend since April 2016.

 

What’s your favorite part of volunteering on the ship?

I get to explore parts of the ship that the public will never get to see and I’m comforted knowing the ship is a little better off every time I walk down the gangplank.

 

What got you to serve on battleship Texas as a volunteer?

There wasn’t one solid reason.  I was sitting bored in my dorm one day and thought I needed to get out more, then remembered doing an overnight on the battleship and it just clicked. Now it’s taken over my life! 

 

Any final words for the World of Warships audience?

I just want to thank everyone who follows updates from our ship and doubly thank anyone who helps support Texas. I hope everyone has a chance to visit Texas at least once.

 

Brook

What’s a day in the life on battleship Texas for you? 

A typical day on the battleship for me consist of welcoming people aboard, answering any questions they have and giving tours of various areas of the ship open to the public.

 

When did you notice that Texas was listing and what were your immediate thoughts?

I wasn’t aboard when it happened. I came after and, along with many other volunteers, helped pump out the water and clean up other areas of the ship. One thing we had to do is retrieve, wash, and restack the oil boom that was swept away. This oil boom is basically a huge, floating nylon curtain that keeps oil spills in place when one occurs. You sometimes see them on the news. Basically, imagine tangled Christmas lights but 200 feet long and underwater. 

How long have you been volunteering aboard the museum ship?

I joined last June literally a month after buying the ship in World of Warships. I went on two previous hard hat tours of the ship in the past and always been interested, but playing it in the game gave me a new sense of duty to finally sign up as a volunteer. 

What’s your favorite part of volunteering on the ship?

My favorite part is conducting the monthly hard hat tours. I guide a group of 10 or so people, along with other volunteers, down into parts of the ship closed to the public. The leader gives a detailed description and history of each compartment of the ship with everything from the bridge down to the magazine. It’s truly an honor and privilege to be able to volunteer on Texas.

Any final words for the World of Warships audience?

The key to keeping this ship alive is keeping the public concerned about her welfare. If we don’t do our best to get future generations interested, then she won’t have a future. That’s why telling her stories to visitors of all ages is so vital to her survival. That’s why I volunteer -- to keep her around for the next generation. I’m grateful to World of Warships for helping us carry on that legacy.

 

Inspired yet? You should be! 

Save Texas